Why you should question the “database per service” pattern

I am not a fan of the database per service model. The correct pattern for the database model in a cloud-native environment is a data abstraction layer that hides the underlying database mechanics while allowing for transactions that span multiple services. The services should not know the architecture of the database, nor should they orchestrate their transactions.

Let’s talk cloud neutrality

Avoiding managed services, using Docker and running eight Mongo and twelve Kafka nodes does not make an application cloud neutral — it makes it costly to develop, Kafkaesque to architect, and impossible to maintain in production. You end up losing your weekends and quality time with family to DR exercises and production support.

Rather than innovating Walmart bullies their tech vendors to leave AWS

On June 16th, Amazon announced they would acquire Whole Foods in what to me seems like the most exciting M&A event of the past couple of years. As a long time customer of Amazon Prime and Amazon Fresh, I couldn't be more excited at the possibilities. Of course, every other retailer is terrified. There are some … Continue reading Rather than innovating Walmart bullies their tech vendors to leave AWS

Collaborative work in the cloud: what I learned teaching my daughter how to code

Whether my third grader becomes a software engineer when she grows up remains to be seen. The ability to customize and extend the behavior of a computer is a skill that is going to remain with her for the lifetime. If she wants to be an educator she can make educational apps. If she becomes a business person or a scientist she will be able to use computers to her advantage. This is what being a citizen developer is all about.

In search for the mythical neutrality among top-tier public cloud providers

This article was originally published by me on my InfoWorld blog in June, 2016. The last time Gartner published their IaaS/PaaS provider rankings Amazon AWS and Microsoft Azure occupied the coveted upper right quadrant. To make it into Gartner's magic quadrant both Amazon and Microsoft needed to demonstrate the quality of their services as well … Continue reading In search for the mythical neutrality among top-tier public cloud providers